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ajc9988
(@ajc9988)
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Posts: 80
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So, the Dewalt DW618PK (2.25HP Router with plunge and fixed base in hard case) and the Dewalt DW735X (13" planer) arrived last night. I'm likely switching my order from Rockler to HD for the Triton TRA001 3.25" HP router to use for a fixed table router (so I won't have to take it in and out since I have the DW618PK). 

I bought the Delta from Lowes. https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-Contractor-Saws-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-15-Amp-Table-Saw/1001385562

It is a table mounted trunnion system rather than cabinet mounted system like the Grizzly Hybrids (also shop fox is made by grizzly as their out-of-house brand, so think Grizzly when you think Shop Fox), but they cost half the price at around $650 vs $1079+$125 shipping for the Shop Fox cheapest model at the moment. Since I cannot rewire currently to 240V outlet in the garage (rental and very small breaker box currently installed), I went with the Delta. Still a beast, able to hold the same size dado blades as the Grizzly hybrids, and runs at 3,600 rpm (the lowest grizzly hybrids run 3,450) with a 2HP motor, 15" left rip and 30" right rip (approximately equal to the Shop Fox, with the Grizzly G0771Z having 16.75" left and 31" right). The Dado width for both Delta and Grizzly is 13/16". The Delta weighs much less (weight is partly accessories, but the weight of the main body also matters if cabinet mounted to help dampen vibrations, which is also why cabinet mounted is better, as it effects the cut through vibrations less). But at 220lbs shipping weight, the Delta is not really a slouch either (as a comparison, the dewalt portable table saw is 46lbs).

But this will force me to, once in a different place that I can run 240V for appliances, to upgrade the table saw, while this not being a pressing issue for a long while.

I plan on either building a router table for the right side or buying the Rockler table saw router table wing ( https://www.rockler.com/bench-dogreg-promax-cast-router-table-without-plate-40-102 ). I like the cast iron part of it, but it could be limited on building some sleds to use with the router (I'm sure I could find other ways to do what I want than building what I previously envisioned in my head while then having a very clean cast iron surface which would extend out the right side ripping capacity (with the router fence removed) by an extra 16". Very tempting.

Also, here is information on the cheapest 10" jointer, which is from JET. It does NOT keep alignment from in feed or out feed. But here is how one person went about fixing that issue (next cheapest 10" is over $1000 more, so if looking for something this large, doing this fix is the only price for most hobbyists):

"The design and precision of workmanship of some aspects of this machine leave a lot to be desired. The upside to me is the compact size, since I have limited space in my basement workshop. I had a similar issue as the previous poster, with the front edge of the infeed table about 1/16 lower than the back edge, and no way to adjust this. Fortunately the two tables were relatively flat in the longitudinal axis (left-to-right), i.e. just a little bit of a break in alignment across the blades. To fix the back-to-front alignment, I custom machined some small parts to replace the factory-made ones (infeed table spacer, part # JJP8BT-51), and also converted the infeed table from a depth-adjustable one to one that is fixed in depth at about 1/16 , to enable me to adjust the alignment accurately. By design, the infeed table is suspended on two rods that pass between the front and back frame panels and through four infeed table spacers that ride in grooves cut into the frame. These grooves are angled at about 19 degrees downwards and to the right of the machine. Per design, adjusting the depth of cut involves moving the infeed table in or out towards or away from the blades, and in the process sliding the spacers with the rods slightly up or down in their grooves. These infeed table spacers consist of a square side that rides in the grooves, and a concentric cylinder that fits into holes in the infeed table. By machining four replacement parts so that the cylinder part is placed eccentrically with respect to the square part, I was able to lift the infeed table in the front and drop it in the back, resulting in a more level infeed table. Since the two tables were relatively flat in the longitudinal axis, and I had to adjust it only in one plane, I made the two front spacers identical to each other, and the same with the two back ones. Had the alignment been off across the blades in addition, I'd have had to figure out how much to adjust the sideways alignment and make the left spacers different from their right mates. In the process, I machined spacers that fit more snugly than the originals, eliminating some of the loose play of the infeed table in the original design. By also tightening the front nuts on the suspension rods, I fixed the front firmly to the frame, and left the back free to move as in the original. Now, small adjustments of the height adjustment knob rock the back edge of the infeed table slightly in or out and up or down, and allow for very accurate calibration. It took me a few evenings after work to make the replacement spacers, but the materials used were cheap. I used a ¼ x ¾ steel welding bar obtained from a DIY store, a drill press, a handheld rotating metal cutting tool, some files, an electronic depth gauge and an electronic caliper. Assembly requires removing the front and back covers, the drive chain and the two suspension rods with all their little parts (unplug it first!). It may be a little easier to just return the whole thing, but I figured the next one would probably not be that much different."

I get the feeling had they not integrated a planer into the jointer, this would not have been an issue. Otherwise, there are some affordable 8" jointers in the $400-500 range which don't have this issue complained about. But I'm only starting my research on jointers and wanted to save this fix for posterity.

I'm open to any critiques on my selection of tools. Also, let me know if you think the Delta was the wrong decision (supposedly the engine issue, which was related to a brake, was fixed on these models last year, so that should not be an issue with the motor).


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ElliottDesigns
(@elliottdesigns)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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Just built a box for my 8" woofer/subwoofer driver out of cardboard whilst I'm waiting for my application to the maker's space to go through. Actually kind of works at 1/4 volume 🤣

Elliott Dyson - Mechanical Engineering Student and 3D printing & Design Freelancer


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TVOR-Ceasar
(@tvor-ceasar)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 667
 

LOL!!!

Hmm, maybe 5 or 6 more layers laminated would stiffen it up significantly. Just a bit of white craft glue and some more spare boxes while you wait...

I actually had a cardboard box speaker I made years ago that I listened to almost daily.  6" AlNiCo speaker hooked to a clock radio. That thing was very loud. And sounded pretty darn good.

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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ajc9988
(@ajc9988)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 80
Topic starter  

BTW, a place for market seconds/blem measuring tools is Taylor Toolworks (taytools.com).

They have some pretty sweet deals on blem PEC combination squares, double squares, replacement blades, rulers, etc. Which, getting PEC at that price is not bad (about half, and the blemish doesn't effect functionality or ability to read them). If nothing else, might be something to poke around and see if there is anything you like.

They also have the igaging table saw alignment tool fairly priced.
https://taytools.com/products/1-ruler-stop-fences?variant=32437342568535

Or a scratch and dent igaging digital mini height gauge for router tables and table saws (always make sure anything digital is matching up with what it should be, especially with scratch and dent). But a height gauge like this should do decently well with setting the saw blade height, router height, or dado, etc. It is limited to 0.1" (just under an eighth of an inch), so if you will need something less than 0.1", then a multi-tool might be better.

https://taytools.com/collections/scratch-and-dent/products/scratch-and-dent-igaging-digital-mini-height-gauge-35-628

https://taytools.com/products/igaging-digital-multi-woodworking-gauge?variant=31371960582231

 


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ajc9988
(@ajc9988)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 80
Topic starter  

@123toid  and anyone else: What dado blade would you recommend?
I'm considering the following:
Freud 8" Super Dado (SD508 - $190):
https://www.freudtools.com/products/SD508

Forrest 8" Dado King (DK08244 - $327):
https://www.forrestblades.com/dado-king/8-dado-king-saw-blade-set-2-outside-blades-6-chippers-and-blade-runner-carrying-case/

Also, any opinions on saw blades is also welcome.


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ElliottDesigns
(@elliottdesigns)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 193
 

@tvor-ceasar Yeah, I don't think I'm going to invest time into laminating my cardboard speaker, probably not worth the time, it was more just to get it usable for testing, but thanks any Charlie. I'll just wait it out 😉👍

Elliott Dyson - Mechanical Engineering Student and 3D printing & Design Freelancer


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