Wattage needed for ...
 

Wattage needed for a DIY Speaker  

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DIYAudiphileElliottBridge
(@diyaudiphileelliottbridge)
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Posts: 71
06/11/2019 11:20 am  

I want to be able to power my speakers at full power just in case I have a party or something. Yet I haven't built my speakers yet as I am planning to get a membership at a local (well I say local) makerspace, this is so I can CNC route my design for that fab, professional looking finish I want.

Anyway, the reason I can't calculate the wattage needed is because I do not know how much power is being wasted in the crossover section. I have the ND-140 4ohm in parallel with the ND25FA 4ohm. Weirdly I get a 4ohm load out of it...

Here is the crossover that I am planning on using (depending on how many watts are going through that series resistor, depends on how many 10W resistors I put together in parallel (I'll still have the same resistance but I'll be using the 1/R^2 relationship for calculating it)):

XSIM

 

The reason I want to know the wattage needed beforehand is so I know which powersupplies I should get for my amplifier boards as I want to use this power system on my current speaker setup until I have built my new speakers.

If I didn't provide enough information, or didn't clarify something please tell me!


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DIYAudiphileElliottBridge
(@diyaudiphileelliottbridge)
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Posts: 71
06/11/2019 11:21 am  

Sorry, also I want the RMS wattage not the peak. We all know peak isn't useful (at least I hope we all know this!) 🙂


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123Toid
(@123toid)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 575
07/11/2019 2:25 pm  

@diyaudiphileelliottbridge

This is a good question and is not easy to answer.  Let me first start by talking about why you have a 4ohm load.  You have a 4 ohm load, since you are handing off (crossing over) responsibilities from one driver to the other.  Since you do this, your drivers will remain at 4 ohm.  Without a proper crossover in place, this would not be the case at all (you would be a t 2ohm).  

Now the reason power handling is tricky is due to many factors, one being power dissipation.  Which basically means you will use more power in your lower frequencies than the upper frequencies.  And without really testing the failure of the speaker versus the wattage applied, it is hard for a DIYer to give the specific, this is your max RMS wattage.  In a two way, you are best to apply the max wattage of the woofer section.  In this case, 4ow rms.  I would personally give it more than that.  You do have I would even push it closer to 100w amplifier.  This is due tot he fact, that you probably wouldn't be giving your speakers anywhere close to 100w ever and would still have head room fro dynamics.


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DIYAudiphileElliottBridge
(@diyaudiphileelliottbridge)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 71
07/11/2019 3:12 pm  

@123toid

Awesome, thanks toid! Ok, so I will go for a 36V 5.6A meanwell power supply instead of the 36V 8.9A I was going to get when I wasn't thinking clearly. That was a great help toid! Thanks.

Hopefully this article can help those having the same difficult question as I. 🙂


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