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Pieter
(@pieter)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 30
 

@ajc9988 

That's an interesting video from Hexibase, MDF doesn't differ that much when you look at the cost of the material.
I don't think you can hear the difference, do you?
However, I do not like MDF if you have to sand / saw it, that dust gets everywhere.

 

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ajc9988
(@ajc9988)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 126
 

@pieter -It's not a large difference. At the same time, up until the first week in June, I could grab 11-layer baltic birch for around $63. Currently, MDF is going for $45 at one store and $50 at the other here. Knowing that for $13-18 mere months ago I could have gotten a product that would reduce the resonance of the cabinet, it kind of chaps me I didn't bite the bullet then.

And you are right, the use of bracing further changes the resonance of the cabinet higher, which can make it less discernible. This is also the same question of ported versus passive radiator, where the port resonance can effect the sound color. But when the cabinet has a resonance that winds up audible, it is called a ringing. It can be audible, but is not always, and this is nothing that can be fixed post building because it is integral to the box design. So you could never correct it out with DSP, etc.

Now, does it matter? Generally, no. MDF is used for a reason, because it is cheap, but also because it gives good performance and the ringing is lower than other construction material, such as certain types of wood. It has a fairly good stiffness. If the industry uses this material in such volumes for decades, they cannot be wrong. So this isn't to say MDF isn't good enough, because it definitely is.

Instead, this is me being butt hurt that my choice of material isn't in stock and hoping it comes back in stock soon (which running the numbers, it really should.

I also hope the speculators will get out of the lumber trading. Anyone that wants a history lesson of the misuse of futures trading and an explanation why oil costs so much, why lumber prices shot up over the past year, etc., look up the US law about Onion Futures and why we ban them. That is the epitome of showing that the cost is artificial because futures trading was taken over by speculators which then trade in the interim on price differentials rather than market differences on the basis of supply and demand. This causes the prices at which the market settles to cost more than had it not been traded and individually negotiated. Even a year ago with Saudi Arabia and Russia maxing production, it caused such a glut that at one point the trading on oil went negative, all because the contracts were coming due and the people holding the contracts were speculators without a place to store the oil and the contracts would need to be settled and the oil stored. Because of that, the speculators had to release their contracts on the market causing an oversupply of contracts with no buyers, thereby dropping the price to the negative.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onion_Futures_Act

"Onion futures trading began on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange in the mid-1940s as an attempt to replace the income lost when the butter futures contract ceased.[3] By the mid-1950s, onion futures contracts were the most traded product on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. In 1955, they accounted for 20% of its trades.[4]"

"In the fall of 1955, Siegel and Kosuga bought so many onions and onion futures that they controlled 98% of the available onions in Chicago.[5] Millions of pounds (thousands of tonnes) of onions were shipped to Chicago to cover their purchases. By late 1955, they had stored 30 million pounds (14,000 t) of onions in Chicago.[6] They soon changed course and convinced onion growers to begin purchasing their inventory by threatening to flood the market with onions if they did not.[6] Siegel and Kosuga told the growers that they would hold the rest of their inventory in order to support the price of onions.[7]

As the growers began buying onions, Siegel and Kosuga accumulated short positions on a large number of onion contracts.[6] They also arranged to have their stores of onions reconditioned because they had started to spoil. They shipped them outside of Chicago to have them cleaned and then repackaged and re-shipped back to Chicago. The "new" shipments of onions caused many futures traders to think that there was an excess of onions and further drove down onion prices in Chicago. By the end of the onion season in March 1956, Siegel and Kosuga had flooded the markets with their onions and driven the price of 50 pounds (23 kg) of onions down to 10 cents a bag.[6] In August 1955, the same quantity of onions had been priced at $2.75 a bag.[7] So many onions were shipped to Chicago in order to depress prices that there were onion shortages in other parts of the United States.[8]

Siegel and Kosuga made millions of dollars on the transaction due to their short position on onion futures.[5] At one point, however, 50 pounds (23 kg) of onions were selling in Chicago for less than the bags that held them. This drove many onion farmers into bankruptcy.[5] A public outcry ensued among onion farmers who were left with large amounts of worthless inventory.[9] Many of the farmers had to pay to dispose of the large amounts of onions that they had purchased and grown.[10]"

Regarding oil prices, look to the US Commodities and Futures Modernization Act slipped into the spending Omnibus that Bill Clinton signed on his way out the door in the December of his final year (leaving 1 month later). Just look at the volatility in oil pricing per barrel following 2000 and you can see the effects of futures trading. All futures has turned into is a speculative vehicle for the financialization of the contract pricing of goods (further than normal contract negotiations, instead securitizing these transactions, just like derivative securities kind of do, but still different and having their own nuance for trading purposes). I'm not going into the nuances on that here, though. Although Gramm-Leach-Bliley overturned Glass-Steagall which separated the commercial and investment banks, and around this same time, they started allowing derivative trading which was banned after the great depression with the 1933 securities act and the 1934 exchange act. And, no surprise, we had an economic crash less than a decade later, then a decade after that because Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act arguably didn't fix the problems and standardized the Federal Reserve to step in without an act of congress and to buy non-performing toxic assets off of banks' sheets, which in 2020 was also expanded into buying corporate bonds (debt), meaning that the FED will never come calling for the bonds to be fulfilled, meaning those corporations, in theory, will have enough cash on hand to fulfill their other debt obligations preventing bankruptcies of insolvent LARGE corporations. But I digress.


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Pieter
(@pieter)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 30
 

@ajc9988 

you are a man of many words, we share the way of thinking .


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Pieter
(@pieter)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 30
 
20210911 155859
20210911 155851

 


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