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LOUD Subwoofer POP whe powering on speaker

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TVOR-Ceasar
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@martin

I'm sorry that the combo popped the amp. Looking over your diagram, it seems that the speaker terminal to delay board looks good, assuming that you aren't paralleling the Left and Right outputs.The power connection is where I am not sure exactly what you are doing. Usually, only the positive comes off the switch, and the negative connects to the power jack's ground trace. That board is very hard to follow. 

What I would do, while awaiting the replacement amp, would be to try to trace the power from the jack through the switch. All you'd need is a continuity meter for that. Luckily, even the cheapest DVM's have that capability. Put your meter to the lowest Ohm setting and touch the leads together, the meter should beep. Now comes the tricky part. With the amp Power Switch set to OFF, touch the center pin of the power jack (+) and touch the 3 terminals of the switch. 1 terminal should beep, that's the V-in to the switch. Theoretically, the other 2 terminals should stay silent. Now set the switch to ON and check the terminals that were silent. 1 should beep. That is the switched VCC that you want to use to power the (+) of the Delay board. Now, move from the center pin of the Power Jack to the side contact (-), it'll be tight. On the back side of the Amp board, find the ground pin of the jack, it'll be the one beeping. Use that for your ground (-) of the Delay board. 

You should be able to test out the power wiring using the old amp board. With JUST the power wires connected between the amp and delay, connect the 19V power supply to the amp. Then switch it on. You should hear the relays click on after a second or two. If that works, you can be pretty confident you've figured out the correct wiring points for power.

When you get the new amp, follow the same procedure, checking along the way. Better to catch a problem early in the steps than to go through the whole connection process only to have an error - easier to fix a little work rather than a whole lot. 😊 

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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marco
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hello,

here is a picture of where on the "Lepai LP210PA 2x30W + 2.1 channels 60 W" you have to solder the power supply wires for the delay card 😉

[url= removed link [/img][/url]


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TVOR-Ceasar
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Thanks, Marco. You'll have to wait for a few more posts before links are allowed. Keeps spammers at bay. If you want to PM me or 123Toid, we can put the link in for you.

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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Arnould
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@marco

I mist your message with the image. Please send it to TVOR-Ceasar or 123Toid.

I'm still having the loud pop. So I ordered the UPC1237 board hooked it up and managed to solder the power to the lepai. Only I'm now having an constantly clicking sound in the speakers. So my guess is that I'm still doing something wrong here.

Please help

 


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marco
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The first time I’m trying it made mistakes 

i put the positif on the POWER T:VIN

and the negatif on the T:AUT

It’s the wrong way because the result is a divide of the voltage by two, and the amp stop to play


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marco
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46DFE67E CB5F 4126 977C 5B72935D1981

Finally I find this point

⛔️ It’s a wrong way I have the clicking sound like Arnould 


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Arnould
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@marco

Thanks for the image. I see that I have an difference there. I soldered the positive wire wrong 😣 . This one I soldered to the right connector of were you have the positive wire soldered. Will make the change as soon as possible and see if this makes an difference. 


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marco
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Waiting for a solution 

 

HELLLP


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marco
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the problem is that the positive is on the T:VIN
when I put the negative on the T:AUT the voltage is divided by two
I go from 19v to 7,5v and the lepai stops working
my solution was to take the negative above because the voltmeter told me that at this place I kept my 19v, but I had not yet connected the speakers, bad surprise... no sound and a regular clicking

if someone tried the adventure and succeeded that it comes to save us...thank you

Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)


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TVOR-Ceasar
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Something doesn't sound right. When power is applied to the delay/relay board(s), there should be a few seconds (+-) and then the relay should energize (pull in) and stay there. There shouldn't be any chatter or clicking, and the voltage shouldn't drop to 1/2 the supply.

Let's go back to the beginning and see if we can logically figure out some stuff. To begin, I'm going to make a few assumptions:
1. You have at least a basic multi-meter that can measure DC voltage and resistance down to continuity.
2. The Power supply and jack on the amp board are Center Positive. This is generally true, except for certain musical instruments such as pedals.

To start the process again, pull the amp board out of the case. You can leave the wires to the speakers connected if it's not too difficult to work with. Stand the board on edge with the power jack sticking up. Now take your multi-meter and set it to Continuity. Place a probe on the center conductor in the power jack and then on the other side of the board, find the solder pad that corresponds - it should beep. Mark that pad with a red dot or a "+". Next place a probe on the side contact in the jack and find the corresponding pad on the other side of the board and mark it with a black dot or a "-".

With that done, make sure the amp is switched off. Plug in the power supply to the jack and the wall. Take the leads from the Delay board and put them on the corresponding pads on the bottom side of the board that you just marked. The delay board should pull in after a short time and hold. If it does, you have confirmed the board is good and have the correct polarity for the board. 

Next, unplug the power supply and make sure the power switch is still off. With your meter still set to Continuity, place 1 probe on the pad you marked in red or "+" and touch each pad of the switch. Only 1 should beep, usually the middle pad. That is the power coming into the switch.

Now, turn the switch on and place 1 probe on that pad on the switch that you've just found and touch the other 2 pads of the switch. There should only be 1 that beeps - that's the one that feeds power to the amp and the one that you want to connect the positive of the Delay board.

Now connect the negative / ground of the Delay board to the "-" of the power jack that you found previously.  Turn the Amp OFF. Plug in the power supply to the amp and the wall. It shouldn't do anything. Now turn the Amp on. The Delay board should pull in after a short time and stay that way.

Let me know if it doesn't.

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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Arnould
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@tvor-ceasar

Thanks for the clear explanation. Followed all steps as described. In the picture you can see how I connected the wires.

When the Amp turns on, the Delay board turns on and after a short time you will hear the clicking sound of the relays. Everything works as expected only when I connect the wires for the speakers I get the annoying click. I tried to connect only the sub and also only the full range speakers. Doesn't matter how I connect the speakers every time I get the clicking sound.
Now maybe it could be the Delay board that I have that is causing the click sound because when I place my ear above the Delay board I can hear a click come from the board. The board I use is a little bit different from the one that is shown earlier in the posts. Also placed an screenshot of the Delay board I use. This one is from AliExpress

delay board
image 67503873

 


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TVOR-Ceasar
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Perchance, does your board say AC IN at the power connector?

It really looks like this one:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4001115498149.html

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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TVOR-Ceasar
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After spending some time on-line and trying to do a re-trace a-la Big Clive, I am getting frustrated with the photos and schematics thereon. Would you be able to take decently lit (your photos are in that range), clear, square on photos of both sides of the Protect board? I am trying to trace it out and there are a few spots I cannot quite grasp where they go. Plus I'd like to see whether your board is similar or if I'm just chasing my tail.

For the photos, you might want to pull back a little and use the zoom function to get a little better coverage angle.

Really, I'm not complaining. I just want to help you as accurately as possible.

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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Arnould
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@tvor-ceasar

I just discovered the problem. It is AC IN like you mentioned and not DC 😩 They send me the wrong Delay board. Going to order the right board today and hopefully they send the right one.

Sorry about the image quality of the delay board. This one was picked from the aliExpress website. 

I will keep you posted.


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TVOR-Ceasar
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You can experiment with that board. The diodes next to the power terminals turn the AC into pulsating DC. That is then filtered by at least 2 of the capacitors nearby and the 7812 positive voltage regulator. So, if you solder the positive wire to the enda of the diodes away from the power terminals (the "ringed" end), and the negative wire to the side that goes to the big/wide trace, it should work.

What bothers me is why it would be clicking only when the speakers are connected. The connections are straight through, from one side to the other, observing the polarity markings. I'll have to pull the datasheet for that chip to see what's going on.

-Charlie
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrueVoiceOfReason


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