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Vesko0o
(@vesko0o)
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Joined: 1 month ago
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30/06/2020 5:03 pm  
  • Hello, I have watched your video in YouTube about the installing of a car CD at home, but I have a question about the input power I will use a 220/12 V transformer,but I am worrying about the wats of this  input power. Does the wata matter? You are using 72 W input, I will try to use a PSU 500w which takes out 192wats at 12v does it going to happen? Could you explain to me more about the input power method for this kind of project. Thank you!!! 

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123Toid
(@123toid)
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30/06/2020 11:59 pm  

@vesko0o

 

I am having a hard time following what you are asking.  But I can say, it doesn't matter if your power supply is capable of 500w or 1000w.  Your car stereo tells it what to pull.  It can never pull more that what the car stereo tells it.  So even ifyou havea 1000w power supply hooked up to a 200w head unit.  It will never pull more than 200w. 


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Vesko0o
(@vesko0o)
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01/07/2020 1:02 am  

@123toid on the video u plugged a 75w power is it enough? Or I should put atleast 200w?


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123Toid
(@123toid)
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Posts: 936
01/07/2020 11:19 am  

@vesko0o That is a judgement call.  We would really need to know the CD player first.  But, typically a CD player doesn't actaully go 45x4 or whatever it claims.  But it never hurts to have overhead. 


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TVOR-Ceasar
(@tvor-ceasar)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 407
01/07/2020 2:44 pm  

@vesko0o

Sorry guys, I've been seriously tied up with work and The HiFi Summit. (it was a blast)

The way that power works is that the "unit" (car CD player / head unit), yours or any other item, will only draw as much power as it needs. So if it needs 12V at 1 Amp (12 Watts), that's all it will draw, even if the power supply is rated for 1000 watts. Automotive head units running on the standard 12V (plus a little, 13.8-14.6 give or take) really only put out about 6-10 watts a channel at most.

The max stated (45W), when investigated, is usually measured at anywhere from 10-20% (or more!) distortion.

With that little secret out of the way - let's look at what you need to know. Take your total wattage - add all channels together to get total wattage. Then divide that by the voltage you are going to use and that will be the Amperage (Amps) that the power supply should be able to deliver. If you look at what I stated above, in actuality you would need 24-40 watts of power plus some to run the rest of the electronics. That's why 123Toid was able to use a 72 watt supply. ie, 40 watts / 12 volts = 3.33 amps. so a 12 volt supply at 4 to 5 amps would work with the above example.

If you have a larger supply, that is good because that gives you something to fall back on when you really crank it up and get to the very end of the amp's power. Don't worry, you'll know if the supply is under-rated. It will pull the voltage down and make it sound fuzzy / weak /or may even shut off. In the case of power supplies, more is usually better.

-Charlie


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